Savory Parmesan Cheese Biscuits – Leite’s Culinaria

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We love biscuits in any form and are always in search of the flakiest, butteriest version we can make. These savory cheese biscuits did not disappoint. They’re perfect for slathering with butter, and the leftovers make drool-worthy breakfast sandwiches.

A savory Parmesan cheese biscuit with butter on a plate and a bowl of biscuits in the background.

Adapted from John Kanell | Preppy Kitchen | Simon Element, 2022

I love reaching for chives to lend a pop of nice green flavor (and color) to these biscuits. You could, of course, omit the chives, which would leave you with an otherwise perfectly classic, flaky buttermilk biscuit that gets a salty tang from the Parmesan. Either way, these are everything you could want on a cool day, whether you’re enjoying them on their own or using them to sop up a hearty stew.–John Kanell


Why our testers loved this

There are many reasons our recipe testers happily devoured these enormous homemade buttermilk biscuits. They found them to be “tender, flavorful, and simple to put together.” Deb Lynch was impressed that the directions were “very easy to understand and follow,” even for a novice biscuit maker.

Miriam joined in with her comment, “Sometimes I find myself daydreaming about biting into the perfectly crisp outside of a buttery biscuit, revealing tender, fluffy layers that flake apart. Lucky for me (and really for the rest of the world as well), these savory Parmesan biscuits with chives offer all of that and more!”

Notes on ingredients

Ingredients for Parmesan cheese biscuits -- flour, buttermilk, baking powder, chives, butter, sugar, and cheese.
  • Butter–Use the best-quality butter that you can find. European-style butter works beautifully here.
  • Chives or scallions–The chives or scallions give these biscuits a decidedly savory flavor, but you can omit them if you prefer a more classic Parmesan cheese buttermilk biscuit.
  • Buttermilk–If you don’t have buttermilk, stir together 1 1/3 cups whole milk and 4 teaspoons lemon juice or white vinegar. Let stand for 5 minutes before using.

How to make this recipe

Dry ingredients for biscuits are whisked in a bowl and butter is worked in with a pastry blender.
  1. Freeze the butter until cold. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Whisk the flour, cheese, baking powder, sugar, salt, pepper, and baking soda together in a large bowl.
  2. Rub the butter into the dry ingredient mixture until the pieces of butter are pea-sized.
Biscuit batter mixed in a bowl, then buttermilk poured into the batter.
  1. Stir in the chives.
  2. Fold the buttermilk into the dry ingredients.
Biscuit dough shaped into a rectangle, then folded, then halved, then stacked.
  1. Pat the dough into a 1-inch-thick square on a floured surface.
  2. Fold the dough in half.
  3. Cut the dough in half.
  4. Stack the two halves on top of each other. Pat the dough back into a 1-inch-thick square. Repeat this process 3 times.
A rectangle of biscuit dough with a biscuit cutter beside it and eight biscuits on a baking sheet with a pastry brush adding butter to the top.
  1. Cut the dough into 3 1/2-inch biscuits. Reroll and cut scraps as needed. Freeze the biscuits for 10 minutes.
  2. Heat oven to 425°F. Brush the chilled biscuits with melted butter and sprinkle with salt. Bake until golden.

Recipe FAQs

Can I freeze these biscuits?

Yes, biscuits generally freeze well. Cool the baked biscuits completely, then wrap them in heavy-duty foil or store them in a resealable freezer bag, being sure to remove all of the air from the bag. Reheat in a 300°F oven until warmed through.

Why are so many biscuits made with buttermilk?

Buttermilk is frequently used for making biscuits because the acid in buttermilk reacts with baking soda and allows the biscuits to rise much higher than if they’d been made with regular milk. The buttermilk also contributes to a sturdier texture and slightly darker edges after baking.

Can I make these without a biscuit cutter?

Yes. To save yourself some time, you can use a bench scraper to divide the dough into eight rectangles. If you want round biscuits but don’t have a cutter, use an upside-down glass to cut the biscuits.

How should I serve these?

A good biscuit is welcome any time of the day, and the testers found that they were equally welcome when served alongside soups and stews, or as a side to a protein, like steak or chicken. They also found that the biscuits worked wonderfully as the base for a breakfast sandwich or eggs Florentine. They are best enjoyed with a schmear of butter and a sprinkling of flaky salt.

Helpful tips

  • When you start shaping and folding the biscuit dough, the mixture will still be very crumbly and may not fully hold together. Don’t be tempted to add more liquid – the dough will come together as you continue folding, stacking, and patting it out.      
  • For best results, keep your ingredients and tools cold.
  • To achieve flaky edges on your biscuits, don’t twist the cutter as you cut the biscuits.
  • Store leftover biscuits in a resealable bag at room temperature for up to 1 day. Rewarm in a low oven until heated through.
A savory Parmesan cheese biscuit with butter on a plate and a bowl of biscuits in the background.

More great savory biscuit recipes

☞ If you make this recipe, or any dish on LC, consider leaving a review, a star rating, and your best photo in the comments below. I love hearing from you.–David

Savory Parmesan Cheese Biscuits

A savory Parmesan cheese biscuit with butter on a plate and a bowl of biscuits in the background.

There are many things to love about this savory version of the classic buttermilk biscuit. They’re flaky, and tender, with a subtle tang from Parmesan cheese. They’re also ideal any time of the day, whether alongside soup or stew, or stuffed with a fried egg for breakfast.

Prep 20 mins

Cook 20 mins

Total 1 hr 10 mins

  • Place the cubed butter in the freezer for 10 minutes to chill. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

  • In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, cheese, baking powder, sugar, salt, pepper, and baking soda.

  • Add the cold butter and toss to coat the pieces with flour. Using a pastry blender or briefly squeezing the pieces of butter between your thumb and forefinger, cut the butter into the flour mixture until the butter pieces are between the size of peas and almonds.

  • Stir in the chives.

  • Add the buttermilk and fold the mixture together with a silicone spatula until the dough is mostly combined but still crumbly. Turn out the dough on a clean work surface and pat it into a 1-inch-thick (25 mm) square.

  • Using a bench scraper or large knife, fold the dough in half like a book. (It may still be very crumbly, and that’s okay.) Cut the dough in half and stack the two halves on top of each other. Pat the dough back into a 1-inch-thick (25 mm) square. Repeat this process three more times, folding, stacking, and patting back down.

  • Use a 3 1/2-inch (10 cm) round cookie cutter dipped in flour to cut out the biscuits. Reroll and cut any scraps as needed.

    Using a 3 1/2-inch cutter makes very large biscuits. If you prefer smaller biscuits, use a smaller cutter or an upside-down glass.

  • Place the biscuits on the prepared baking sheet 1 inch (25 mm) apart and freeze for 10 minutes or refrigerate for 30 minutes.

  • Preheat the oven to 425ºF (220°C).

  • Brush the chilled biscuits with the melted butter and sprinkle with the flaky salt, if desired. Bake until the tops are golden brown and the sides are very flaky, 18 to 23 minutes.

  • Serve warm with butter.

  1. Don’t add extra liquid–When you start shaping and folding the biscuit dough, the mixture will still be very crumbly and may not fully hold together. Don’t be tempted to add more liquid – the dough will come together as you continue folding, stacking, and patting it out.
  2. Keep it cold–For best results, keep your ingredients and tools cold. If the dough becomes too soft and sticky, pop it into the fridge for 10 minutes before working on it.
  3. Don’t twist the biscuit cutter–To achieve flaky edges on your biscuits, don’t twist the cutter as you cut the biscuits.
  4. Make your own buttermilk–If you don’t have buttermilk, stir together 1 1/3 cups whole milk and 4 teaspoons lemon juice or white vinegar. Let stand for 5 minutes before using.
  5. Storage–Store leftover biscuits in a resealable bag at room temperature for up to 1 day. Rewarm in a low oven until heated through.

Serving: 1biscuitCalories: 493kcal (25%)Carbohydrates: 54g (18%)Protein: 12g (24%)Fat: 26g (40%)Saturated Fat: 16g (100%)Polyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 69mg (23%)Sodium: 742mg (32%)Potassium: 315mg (9%)Fiber: 2g (8%)Sugar: 4g (4%)Vitamin A: 856IU (17%)Vitamin C: 1mg (1%)Calcium: 245mg (25%)Iron: 3mg (17%)

#leitesculinaria on Instagram If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #LeitesCulinaria. We’d love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Recipe Testers’ Reviews

Recipe © 2022 John Kanell. Photos © 2022 David Leite. All rights reserved. All materials used with permission.

#leitesculinaria on Instagram If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #LeitesCulinaria. We’d love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.





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